Truth and Authority in Augustine's City of God 

July 30 to August 5, 2023  

Prof. Russell Hittinger & Fr. Michael Sherwin, OP - University of California, Berkeley

This  seminar is an intensive week-long course in how to read, analyze, and  discern the many themes in Augustine’s most ambitious and sprawling  work. The City of God tells the history of two societies, and  their respective origins, progress, and appointed ends. The story is  engaged first from the evidence of profane history (I-XI) and then from  the evidence of revelation (XII-XXII). In this seminar, participants  will discuss how Augustine reckons with the crisis of the ancient and  the human city, and whether it is possible to reconcile truth and  authority across the competing domains of polity, religion, and  philosophical wisdom. These themes will be approached from an  interdisciplinary perspective, addressing questions pertinent to  students in political science, philosophy, law, theology, religious  studies, and history.

Format: There will be  two 2.5-hour sessions each day. Each session will include an opening  lecture and seminar-style discussion of the text and the issues at hand.  Students will be expected to prepare the readings carefully and  participate in the discussions of the material.

Location:  The seminar  will take place at the University of California, Berkeley. Students will  be provided with lodging, meals, and a travel stipend of up to $350.

Application Information: This  seminar will be open to JD, PhD students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty in the humanities and relevant  fields (such as philosophy, theology, English, classics, law and  history).

Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no  longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar  might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).

All application materials can be  submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not  be considered. Fifteen students will be admitted to this seminar. 

The applications is due on February 20, 2023.

Any further questions can be directed to seminars@lumenchristi.org.

                                 Monastic Wisdom Seminar "The Schola Caritatis"

                                                           June 5 to June 11          

                   The Lumen Christi Institute and Our Lady of the Angel Monastery, 

a Trappistine monastery located near Crozet, Virginia are partnering for the first time to organize a retreat that explores the monastic wisdom tradition. The Trappistine Community at Crozet, Virginia lives according to a continual tradition of Christian monasticism with its roots in the Cistercian Tradition.

This seminar will offer the possibility of not only learning the guiding principles that foster a good and balanced life according to the monastic tradition, but of putting them into practice, since it is experience alone that leads not only to correct understanding but to real wisdom.

After reading some core texts in the monastic tradition in advance, participants will then spend a week praying, working, reading, and learning from the Sisters during two daily conferences and other times of sharing and mutual exchange.

The goals of the seminar are fourfold:

1.  Introduce participants to monastic life and the history and theology of monasticism.

2.  Introduce participants to monastic practices, including community life, lectio divina, the Divine Office, the discipline of silence, and manual labor, and see how these practices form a balanced whole that fosters human and spiritual growth.

3.  Provide an opportunity for participants to learn more about the longstanding ascetical and mystical guidelines that support prayer in the Catholic monastic tradition.

4.  Study texts of major figures of the monastic tradition and see how their teaching can illuminate and enrich our human experience.


PRINCIPAL TEXTS FOR DISCUSSION

•  Evagrius Ponticus, Praktikos and Chapters on Prayer, trans. John Eudes Bamberger, CS 4 (Cistercian Publications, 1972).

•  Benedict of Nursia, RB 1980: The Rule of St. Benedict (Liturgical Press, 1981).

·    Michael Casey, The Road to Eternal Life: Reflections on the Prologue of Benedict’s Rule,   (Liturgical Press, 2010).

•  Bernard of Clairvaux, Sermons on the Song of Songs I, trans. Kilian Walsh, CF 4 (Cistercian   Publications, 1971).

•  William of St Thierry, The Mirror of Faith, trans. Thomas X Davis, CF 15 (Cistercian Publications,   1979)

·    Beatrice of Nazareth, The Seven Modes of Love

How to read the texts: Besides taking advantage of the introductions to be found in these books, slow reading is the best approach to these texts. It’s also helpful to bear in mind Bernard McGinn’s advice in his introduction to the Sermons of Isaac of Stella (Cistercian Publications, 1979). Dr. McGinn encourages the reader to be challenged by the texts instead of attempting to fit them into the confines of their own horizons. Doing this implies being prepared to bracket our spontaneous critical reactions, and renouncing the attitude of picking out what seems useful and rejecting the rest. It’s precisely by the effort to appreciate this “strangeness” in the texts that we will come away from our reading richer than when we began, our horizons widened, our world expanded.

LOCATION AND FORMAT

•  The seminar will take place at Our Lady of the Angels Monastery in Crozet, Virginia.

•  The seminar sessions will be led by the Sisters of the monastery.

•  Travel stipends will be available for currently enrolled students.

•  Lodging, meals, and books will be provided.

•  Participants will arrive at Our Lady of the Angels Monastery on Monday, June 12 (before 5 pm), and depart on Sunday, June 18 (after 9:30 am).

•  Participants will be required to read the assigned materials in preparation for the seminar.

APPLICATION INFORMATION

•  Open to women age 18 through 40. Catholics and non-Catholics are invited to apply.

•  Applicants must submit an online application including a statement of interest, a CV or resume, and a letter of recommendation from a professor or pastor.

James R. Otteson, University of Notre Dame

Lloyd Sandelands, University of Michigan

Andreas Widmer, The Catholic University of America

Msgr. Martin Schlag, University of St. Thomas


We are pleased to announce the third annual seminar on "Business and Catholic Social Thought: A Primer." During the seminar, graduate students and faculty members in business schools will cover foundational principles in Catholic social thought and apply them to their own field of research and teaching. This seminar aims at widening epistemological preconceptions and showing practical implications of Catholic social thought for business in a way that affirms the goodness of business directed toward the common good. Participants will delve into social encyclicals, secondary sources, and relevant business texts that show the path for principled entrepreneurship in order to gain knowledge, exchange experiences, receive help with their syllabi and consider how best to integrate Catholic social thought into business education.


Location: The seminar will take place at the Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. between Tuesday May 23 and Friday May 26.

A limited number of travel stipends for students are available on a per need basis (see the application form). All participants will be provided with accommodations and meals.


Application Information: This seminar will be open to graduate students and faculty of any specialization in business schools.
Applicants will be required to submit a completed online application, including:

  • An updated CV/resume.
  • A brief statement of research interest related to Catholic social thought no longer than 750 words.
  • One academic writing sample.
  • All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Fifteen students will be admitted to this seminar. Application materials are due February, 20 in 2023.

The Lumen Christi Fellows are selected from students at the University of Chicago and other area universities. Fellows demonstrate an interest in the Catholic intellectual tradition and in sharing community with peers. They receive invitations to private events, dinners, and seminars, while committing to reasonable participation in Lumen Christi programs. Fellows are invited to focus on key areas relevant to their interests: Scripture, Theology and Philosophy, Political Thought, Science and Religion, Catholic Literature and Culture, the University and Liberal Education. The Fellows’ leadership team coordinates with Lumen Christi staff on vision and programming. Interested students are encouraged to apply.

Direct any further questions to Michael Le Chevallier.

Gregory of Nazianzen’s Five Theological Orations
St. Michael's College, University of Toronto
June 25—July 1, 2023


Lewis Ayres, University of Durham

Fr. Andrew Summerson, University of Toronto 


Professor Lewis Ayres and Fr. Andrew Summerson will lead a summer seminar of graduate students in a close reading of Gregory of Nazianzen’s Theological Orations. A difficult character who for a time presided over the Council of Constantinople in 381, Gregory (c.330 – 390) was one of the most well-educated among fourth-century Christian thinkers. His five Theological Orations, delivered during his tenure in Constantinople between 379 and 381, are works of high art, as well as complex theology, and generated extensive commentary throughout later Byzantine history. The Orations are sometimes enigmatic, lacking the prolixity of Basil of Caesarea and Gregory of Nyssa’s works, but the attack on Eunomius (and others) to defend the Nicene faith found in the Orations is no less fascinating or profound. Gregory’s Orations constitute one of the key works that define pro-Nicene theology and shape the orthodox Trinitarian faith.

·  The seminar will be held at Windle House, hosted by the Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern  Christian Studies at the University of St. Michael’s College in the University of Toronto.

·  Meals and lodging will be provided.

·  Participants will receive a stipend of up to $350 to offset travel expenses.

·  Participants will arrive on Sunday, June 25 and depart on Friday, July 1.

·  Participants will be provided with a copy of On God and Christ: The Five Theological Orations and two Letters to Cledonius, trans. L. Wickham and R. Norris (Crestwood: SVS Press, 2002).

·  Fifteen applicants will be admitted to the seminar.

Working knowledge of relevant ancient languages will be helpful, but not essential. Preference will be given to Ph.D. students in theology, philosophy, classics, and other relevant fields of study, though advanced M.A. students will be considered.

There will be two sessions each day in the morning and in the afternoon. Each session will include lectures and seminar-style discussions working through all five orations, and parallel texts from Gregory, other Cappadocian theologians, and select passages from Maximus the Confessor’s principal commentary on Gregory, the Ambigua. Students will be expected to prepare the readings carefully and participate in the discussions of the material.

Lewis Ayres is Professor of Catholic and Historical Theology at the University of Durham, UK. He previously taught at the Candler School of Theology, Emory University. He was also a Distinguished Fellow of the Notre Dame Institute for Advanced Study (2014-2015). Among his books are Nicaea and Its Legacy (Oxford 2004/6) and Augustine and the Trinity (Cambridge 2010/14).  He is currently working on a book entitled As It Is Written: Ancient Literary Criticism, Hellenization and the Rise of Scripture 150-250 for Princeton University Press.

Fr. Andrew Summerson is Assistant Professor of Greek Patristics at the Sheptytsky Institute of Eastern Christian Studies in the Faculty of Theology at the University of St. Michael’s College and program fellow in Patristics at the Lumen Christi Institute. He is the author of Divine Scripture and Human Emotion in Maximus the Confessor (Brill 2020). He is currently working on a book exploring Maximus the Confessor’s interpretation of Gregory of Nazianzen.

THE APPLICATION DEADLINE IS March 13, 2023.
Contact us with any questions at seminars@lumenchristi.org.

Economics and Catholic Social Thought: A Primer

June 19-June 23, 2023
Pontifical University of the Holy Cross

Mary Hirschfeld, University of Notre Dame

Kirk Doran, University of Notre Dame
Joseph P. Kaboski, University of Notre Dame
Msgr. Martin Schlag, University of St. Thomas

Now in its sixth year, this seminar is designed as an introduction and immersion into Catholic social thought for graduate students and faculty in economics, finance, or related fields. Participants will cover foundational principles in Catholic social thought, starting with the human person, dignity, freedom, subsidiarity, solidarity, and the common good, and moving toward applications of these principles to conceptual understandings and ethical considerations involving economic topics such as utility theory, firm and business ethics, wages, markets, globalization, poverty, and development. Participants will delve into social encyclicals, secondary sources, and relevant economics texts.


Format: There will be two or three sessions each day for five days, each featuring a different instructor. Each instructor will open with a lecture, and then we will turn to a seminar-style discussion of the texts and issues at hand. In the final sessions, we will discuss how the material can be applied to each student’s particular area of interest.


Location: The seminar will take place at the Pontifical University of Santa Croce in Rome. Travel stipends are available on a need basis. All participants will be provided with accommodations and meals.


Application Information: This seminar will be open to PhD students and faculty in economics, finance and related fields.
Applicants will be required to submit a completed online application form, including:

  • An updated CV.
  • A brief statement of research interest no longer than 750 words.
  • One academic writing sample.
  • All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Fifteen students will be admitted to this seminar. Application materials are due February 14, 2023.


Please direct any further questions to contact@credo-economists.org.

The Thought of John Henry Newman
Merton College, University of Oxford
July 1-8, 2023

Fr. Stephen Fields, SJ, Georgetown University


Now in its tenth year, this intensive seminar will examine the achievements of Saint John Henry Newman as a theologian, philosopher, educator, preacher, and writer. Remarkably, in each of these areas Newman produced works that have come to be recognized as classics: An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, The Grammar of Assent, The Idea of a University, The Parochial and Plain Sermons, and the Apologia Pro Vita Sua. This seminar will approach Newman’s thought through a critical engagement with these texts.

LOCATION AND FORMAT

  • The seminar will be held at Merton College, Oxford.
  • Meals and lodging will be provided.
  • Participants will receive a stipend of up to $700 to offset travel expenses.
  • Participants will arrive on Saturday, July 1 and depart on Saturday, July 8.
  • Participants will be required to read the assigned texts in preparation for the seminar.
  • Fifteen applicants will be admitted to the seminar.



QUALIFICATIONS AND APPLICATION
This seminar is open to Ph.D. students in theology, philosophy, classics, and other relevant fields of study.

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and no more than two letter(s) of recommendation.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).
  • All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered

THE APPLICATION DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 20, 2023.
Contact us with any questions at seminars@lumenchristi.org.

Lumen Christi Institute