“Economics and Catholic Social Thought: A Primer

May 22-26, 2017

University of Notre Dame Rome Gateway & The Pontfical University of Santa Croce

Rome, Italy

Martijn Cremers, University of Notre Dame
Fr. Robert Gahl, Pontifical University of Santa Croce
Mary Hirschfeld, Villanova University
Joseph P. Kaboski, University of Notre Dame
Fr. Martin Schlag, University of St. Thomas

This seminar is designed as an introduction and immersion into Catholic social thought for graduate students and faculty in economics, finance, or related fields. Participants will cover foundational principles in Catholic social thought starting with the human person, dignity, freedom, subsidiarity, solidarity, and the common good, and moving toward applications of these principles to conceptual understandings and ethical considerations involving economic topics such as utility theory, firm and business ethics, wages, markets, globalization, poverty, and development. Participants will delve into social encyclicals, secondary sources, and relevant economics texts.

Format: There will be twenty hours of class in addition to a full Roman experience.  Each class will open with a brief lecture, and then we will turn to a seminar style discussion of the texts and issues at hand.  Classroom activities will be supplemented with opportunities for daily Mass, meetings with Church leadership, and visits to famous sights in Rome.

Location: The seminar will take place in Rome, split between the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway and the Pontificia Università della Santa Croce. Students will be provided with accommodations and meals, and a limited number of travel stipends are available on a need basis.

Application Information:
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students and faculty in Economics, Finance and related fields.

Applicants will be required to submit a completed online application form, including:

  • An updated CV.
  • A brief statement of research interest no longer than 750 words.
  • One academic writing sample.

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Application materials must be received by 11:59pm on MARCH 4, 2017.

Please direct any further questions to contact@credo-economists.org.






 

The Lumen Christi Institute Associates Program offers graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Chicago opportunities for greater scholarly exchange and enrichment during their time as students.  Participants in the program will receive invitations to conferences, as well as private colloquia, master classes, study retreats, dinners, and occasionally downtown events organized by the Institute.  The Institute also supports the intellectual work of Associates by helping to organize and fund reading groups and study circles that enable graduate students to better integrate faith and scholarship.  Associates are invited to participate in the planning of certain programs and to play a role in making suggestions in areas of scholarly interest that may be suitable for our University Program.  In short, the Associates Program at the Lumen Christi Institute offers students at the University of Chicago greater participation in the life of the Institute with the ultimate goal of strengthening both faith and intellectual life in equal measure.

 

How To Apply

Please fill out the application form  to apply. Direct any questions to our program coordinator, Mark Franzen at mfranzen@lumenchristi.org 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Will the list of associates be made public?

No, the Institute will not make a list of its associates public, nor will associates be mentioned by name in private literature to donors or foundations.  Any individual wishing to make their status be publicly known can do so.

 

Is there any cost associated with being an associate?

No.  It may be that if an associate chooses to participate in one of our international or regional events, some part of travel costs will need to be met personally.  But generally speaking, there is no charge to be an associate, or to participate in our events designed for associates.

 

Can I become an Associate if I am not a student at the University of Chicago?

Yes.  If you are a graduate student who resides in Chicago and often participates in our events, and yet are not a graduate student at the University of Chicago, you are still encouraged to apply.

 

What sort of commitment am I making as an Associate?

An Associate is someone who explicitly commits to participating more fully in the life of The Lumen Christi Institute, to the extent that his or her schedule allows.

“Catholic Social Thought: A Critical Investigation

July 30-August 5, 2017

Prof. Russell Hittinger

University of California, Santa Barbara

In this seminar, students will read, analyze, and discern continuities and discontinuities in Catholic Social Thought from the late 19th century to the present. Lectures, seminar reports, and discussion will focus on original sources (encyclicals and other magisterial documents), beginning with Rerum novarum (1892) and concluding with Caritas in veritate (2009) and Evangelii Gaudium (2013). This intensive course is multi-disciplinary, since this tradition of social thought overlaps several disciplines in the contemporary university including political science, political philosophy, law, economics, theology, and history.

Format: There will be two 2 ½ hour sessions each day.  Professor Hittinger will open each session with a lecture, and then we will turn to general, seminar-style discussion of the text and the issues at hand. Students will be expected to make seminar presentations of the material under discussion.

Seminar Leader: 
Russell Hittinger is the William K. Warren Professor of Catholic Studies and Research Professor of Law at the University of Tulsa.  He is also a member of the Pontifical Academy of the Social Sciences and the Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas.  Professor Hittinger is the author of many books, including A Critique of the New Natural Law TheoryThe First Grace: Rediscovering Natural Law in a Post-Christian Age, and Thomas Aquinas the Rule of Law.

Location: The seminar will take place at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Students will be provided with a travel stipend, accommodations, and meals.

Application Information: 
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students in the humanities and social sciences (such as philosophy, theology, political science, history & medieval studies).

 Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Application materials must be received by 11:59pm on MARCH 4, 2017.

The Lumen Christi Institute exists to promotes the Catholic Intellectual Tradition and is committed to the integration of the intellectual and spiritual life. The Institute welcomes seminar participants of all or no religious affiliation, and wants to assure all applicants that the opportunities to participate in devotional activities are optional.

Please direct any further questions to seminars@lumenchristi.org.






“Is God Knowable by Natural Reason? Philosophy, Theology, and Trinitarian Thought in the Middle Ages”

June 22-28, 2017

Prof. Mark Clark, Catholic University of America
Prof. Timothy Noone, Catholic University of America

Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, Rome

In this seminar, historian of medieval theology Mark Clark and scholar of medieval philosophy Timothy Noone will offer an intensive survey of theological and philosophical debates about the natural knowledge of God in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Participants will read and discuss the writings Peter Abelard, Peter Lombard, Bonaventure, Albert the Great, and Thomas Aquinas as well as modern philosophical engagement with these questions.

Format: There will be two 2 ½ hour sessions each day. Each session will include an opening lecture and seminar-style discussion of the text and the issues at hand. Students will be expected to prepare the readings carefully and participate in the discussions of the material.

Seminar Leaders:

Mark J. Clark is Associate Professor of Church History, Historical & Systematic Theology, and Spirituality at the Catholic University of America. He holds a Ph.D. in Medieval History from Columbia University, a J.D. from Duke University and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Florida. Dr. Clark works on the formation of the scholastic tradition, biblical as well as theological, from 1150 to 1350. He is currently publishing extensively on Peter Lombard, Peter Comestor, and Stephen Langton and is working together with Alexander Andrée of the Centre for Medieval Studies at The University of Toronto to sort out what happened to the biblical Gloss at Paris during the second half of the twelfth century. He is also editing, together with Professor Tim Noone of the School of Philosophy and Professor Joshua Benson of STRS, the early thirteenth-century sources, both Franciscan and Dominican, for Saints Bonaventure and Aquinas.

Timothy B. Noone is Ordinary Professor of Philosophy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., is also Co-Director of the Scotus Project and President of the Society for Medieval and Renaissance Philosophy. He holds an M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Toronto and the M.S.L. from the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies. He is the author of numerous book chapters and articles on medieval philosophy including Of Angels and Men: Sketches from High Medieval Epistemology (The Etienne Gilson Series 34) and has coedited numerous works in the theOpera Philosophica of Duns Scotus (St. Bonaventure, NY: Franciscan Institute) and has also coedited  A Companion to Philosophy in the Middle Ages (Oxford, 2003).

Location: The seminar will take place at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, Rome. Students will be provided with a travel stipend, accommodations, and meals.

Application Information: 
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students in the humanities and social sciences (such as philosophy, theology, political science, history & medieval studies).

 Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Application materials must be received by 11:59pm on MARCH 4, 2017.

The Lumen Christi Institute exists to promotes the Catholic Intellectual Tradition and is committed to the integration of the intellectual and spiritual life. The Institute welcomes seminar participants of all or no religious affiliation, and wants to assure all applicants that the opportunities to participate in devotional activities are optional.

Please direct any further questions to seminars@lumenchristi.org.

“The Thought of John Henry Newman

July 9-15, 2017

Rev. Ian Ker

Merton College, University of Oxford

Now in its fifth consecutive year, this intensive seminar will examine Newman's achievement as theologian, philosopher, educator, preacher, and writer. Remarkably, in each of these areas Newman produced works that have come to be recognized as classics:  An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, The Grammar of Assent, The Idea of a University, The Parochial and Plain Sermons, and the Apologia Pro Vita Sua. This seminar will approach Newman’s thought through a critical engagement with these texts.

Format: There will be two 2-hour sessions each day.  The seminar will include presentations by Prof. Ker and by participants on the readings assigned, followed by seminar style discussion.

Seminar Leader:  Ian Ker is the leading authority on the thought and writings of John Henry Newman, and is the author and editor of more than 20 books on Newman, including John Henry Newman: A Biography, Newman and Faith, Newman and Truth, and The Achievement of John Henry Newman. He is also author of The Catholic Revival in English Literature 1845-1961, Mere Catholicism, and most recently, G.K. Chesterton: A Biography. Ker is a senior research fellow at Blackfriars Hall, Oxford University.  He received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge, and holds an Honorary Doctorate of Letters from the University of Leicester. 

Location: The seminar will take place at Merton College at the University of Oxford. Students will be provided with a travel stipend, accommodations, and meals.

Application Information: 
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students in the humanities and social sciences (such as philosophy, theology, english, classics, & history).

 Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Application materials must be received by 11:59pm on MARCH 4, 2017.

The Lumen Christi Institute exists to promotes the Catholic Intellectual Tradition and is committed to the integration of the intellectual and spiritual life. The Institute welcomes seminar participants of all or no religious affiliation, and wants to assure all applicants that the opportunities to participate in devotional activities are optional.

Any further questions can be directed to seminars@lumenchristi.org.