Aquinas's Five Ways and Where they Lead
June 29-July 3, 2019
Stephen Brock
University of Chicago

This intensive seminar will discuss St. Thomas Aquinas’s Five Ways of proving the existence of a God and the conception that he thinks they yield: that of a God who is at once utterly simple and utterly perfect, and therefore utterly beyond our comprehension. The sessions will center on Summa theologiae, I, qq. 2-4—especially, of course, I, q. 2, a. 3, which contains the Five Ways themselves—and on selected texts from I, qq. 12 & 13.  Participants will also discuss relevant passages from other works of St. Thomas, as well as his historical influences and some related contemporary issues.

Format: There will be two 2 ½ hour sessions each day. Each session will include an opening lecture and seminar-style discussion of the text and the issues at hand. Students will be expected to prepare the readings carefully and participate in the discussions of the material.

Location: The seminar will take place at the University of Chicago. Students will be provided with meals during the seminar and a stipend for housing and travel.

Application Information: This seminar will be open to doctoral students in the humanities and relevant fields.

Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Fifteen students will be admitted to this seminar. Application materials are due February 1, 2020.

Any further questions can be directed here.

 
Business and Catholic Social Thought: A Primer
July 6-9, 2020
University of Notre Dame
South Bend, IN

Led by:
Lloyd Sandelands
Professor Martin Cremers
Professor Andreas Widmer
Professor Martin Schlag

We are pleased to announce the second annual seminar on "Business and Catholic Social Thought: A Primer." During the seminar, graduate students and faculty members in business schools will cover foundational principles in Catholic social thought and apply them to their own field of research and teaching. This seminar aims at widening epistemological preconceptions and showing practical implications of Catholic social thought for business in a way that affirms the goodness of business directed toward the common good. Participants will delve into social encyclicals, secondary sources, and relevant business texts that show the path for principled entrepreneurship in order to gain knowledge, exchange experiences, receive help with their syllabi and consider how best to integrate Catholic social thought into business education.

This seminar is cosponsored by the John A. Ryan Institute for Catholic Social Thought at the University of St. Thomas (MN); the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame; the Ciocca Center for Principled Entrepreneurship at the Catholic University of America; the Lumen Christi Institute; and the Markets, Culture and Ethics Research Centre at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, Rome.

Location: The seminar will take place at the Mendoza School of Business at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. A limited number of travel stipends are available on a per need basis (see the application form). All participants will be provided with accommodations and meals.

Application Information: This seminar will be open to graduate students and faculty of any specialization in business schools.

Applicants will be required to submit a completed online application, including:

  • An updated CV/resume.
  • A brief statement of research interest related to Catholic social thought no longer than 750 words.
  • One academic writing sample.

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Fifteen students will be admitted to this seminar. Application materials are due March 1, 2020. Final decisions will be sent out April 1, 2020.

Please direct any further questions HERE.

Truth and Authority in Augustine's City of God
July 26-31, 2020
Prof. Russell Hittinger & Fr. Michael Sherwin, OP
University of California, Berkeley

This  seminar is an intensive week-long course in how to read, analyze, and  discern the many themes in Augustine’s most ambitious and sprawling  work. The City of God tells the history of two societies, and  their respective origins, progress, and appointed ends. The story is  engaged first from the evidence of profane history (I-XI) and then from  the evidence of revelation (XII-XXII). In this seminar, participants  will discuss how Augustine reckons with the crisis of the ancient and  the human city, and whether it is possible to reconcile truth and  authority across the competing domains of polity, religion, and  philosophical wisdom. These themes will be approached from an  interdisciplinary perspective, addressing questions pertinent to  students in political science, philosophy, law, theology, religious  studies, and history.

Format: There will be  two 2.5-hour sessions each day. Each session will include an opening  lecture and seminar-style discussion of the text and the issues at hand.  Students will be expected to prepare the readings carefully and  participate in the discussions of the material.

Location:  The seminar  will take place at the University of California, Berkeley. Students will  be provided with lodging, meals, and a travel stipend of up to $350.

Application Information: This  seminar will be open to JD, PhD students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty in the humanities and relevant  fields (such as philosophy, theology, English, classics, law and  history). 

 Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no  longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar  might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).
     

All application materials can be  submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not  be considered. Fifteen students will be admitted to this seminar. The applications is due on February 1, 2020.

Any further questions can be directed to seminars@lumenchristi.org.

 

The Lumen Christi Institute Associates Program offers graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Chicago opportunities for greater scholarly exchange and enrichment during their time as students.  Participants in the program will receive invitations to conferences, as well as private colloquia, master classes, study retreats, dinners, and occasionally downtown events organized by the Institute.  The Institute also supports the intellectual work of Associates by helping to organize and fund reading groups and study circles that enable graduate students to better integrate faith and scholarship.  Associates are invited to participate in the planning of certain programs and to play a role in making suggestions in areas of scholarly interest that may be suitable for our University Program.  In short, the Associates Program at the Lumen Christi Institute offers students at the University of Chicago greater participation in the life of the Institute with the ultimate goal of strengthening both faith and intellectual life in equal measure.

 

How To Apply

Please fill out the application form  to apply. Direct any questions to our program coordinator, Mark Franzen at mfranzen@lumenchristi.org 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Will the list of associates be made public?

No, the Institute will not make a list of its associates public, nor will associates be mentioned by name in private literature to donors or foundations.  Any individual wishing to make their status be publicly known can do so.

 

Is there any cost associated with being an associate?

No.  It may be that if an associate chooses to participate in one of our international or regional events, some part of travel costs will need to be met personally.  But generally speaking, there is no charge to be an associate, or to participate in our events designed for associates.

 

Can I become an Associate if I am not a student at the University of Chicago?

Yes.  If you are a graduate student who resides in Chicago and often participates in our events, and yet are not a graduate student at the University of Chicago, you are still encouraged to apply.

 

What sort of commitment am I making as an Associate?

An Associate is someone who explicitly commits to participating more fully in the life of The Lumen Christi Institute, to the extent that his or her schedule allows.

Economics and Catholic Social Thought: A Primer

June 28-July 1, 2020

University of Notre Dame

South Bend, IN

Martijn Cremers, University of Notre Dame
Fr. Robert Gahl, Pontifical University of the Holy Cross
Mary Hirschfeld, Villanova University
Joseph P. Kaboski, University of Notre Dame

Now in its fifth year, this seminar is designed as an introduction and immersion into Catholic social thought for graduate students and faculty in economics, finance, or related fields. Participants will cover foundational principles in Catholic social thought, starting with the human person, dignity, freedom, subsidiarity, solidarity, and the common good, and moving toward applications of these principles to conceptual understandings and ethical considerations involving economic topics such as utility theory, firm and business ethics, wages, markets, globalization, poverty, and development. Participants will delve into social encyclicals, secondary sources, and relevant economics texts.


This seminar is sponsored by the Lumen Christi Institute, the Catholic Research Economists Discussion Organization, the Notre Dame Center for Ethics and Culture, the Kellogg Institute for International Studies, and the Notre Dame Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts.


Format: There will be two sessions each day for three days, each featuring a different instructor. Each instructor will open with a lecture, and then we will turn to a seminar-style discussion of the texts and issues at hand. In the final sessions, we will discuss how the material can be applied to each student’s particular area of interest.

Location: The seminar will take place at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana. A limited number of travel stipends are available on a need basis. All participants will be provided with accommodations and meals.

Application Information: This seminar will be open to PhD students and faculty in economics, finance and related fields.

Applicants will be required to submit a completed online application form, including:

  • An updated CV.
  • A brief statement of research interest no longer than 750 words.
  • One academic writing sample.

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. Fifteen students will be admitted to this seminar. Application materials are due March 1, 2020. Final decisions will be sent out April 1, 2020.

Please direct any further questions to contact@credo-economists.org.

Lumen Christi Institute