The Lumen Christi Institute Associates Program offers graduate and undergraduate students at the University of Chicago opportunities for greater scholarly exchange and enrichment during their time as students.  Participants in the program will receive invitations to conferences, as well as private colloquia, master classes, study retreats, dinners, and occasionally downtown events organized by the Institute.  The Institute also supports the intellectual work of Associates by helping to organize and fund reading groups and study circles that enable graduate students to better integrate faith and scholarship.  Associates are invited to participate in the planning of certain programs and to play a role in making suggestions in areas of scholarly interest that may be suitable for our University Program.  In short, the Associates Program at the Lumen Christi Institute offers students at the University of Chicago greater participation in the life of the Institute with the ultimate goal of strengthening both faith and intellectual life in equal measure.

 

How To Apply

Please fill out the application form  to apply. Direct any questions to our program coordinator, Mark Franzen at mfranzen@lumenchristi.org 

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Will the list of associates be made public?

No, the Institute will not make a list of its associates public, nor will associates be mentioned by name in private literature to donors or foundations.  Any individual wishing to make their status be publicly known can do so.

 

Is there any cost associated with being an associate?

No.  It may be that if an associate chooses to participate in one of our international or regional events, some part of travel costs will need to be met personally.  But generally speaking, there is no charge to be an associate, or to participate in our events designed for associates.

 

Can I become an Associate if I am not a student at the University of Chicago?

Yes.  If you are a graduate student who resides in Chicago and often participates in our events, and yet are not a graduate student at the University of Chicago, you are still encouraged to apply.

 

What sort of commitment am I making as an Associate?

An Associate is someone who explicitly commits to participating more fully in the life of The Lumen Christi Institute, to the extent that his or her schedule allows.

Ends on February 15, 2018

“St. Thomas Aquinas on Free Choice

June 27-July 4, 2018

Stephen Brock

University of Chicago

his seminar will be a five-day, intensive discussion aimed at understanding and evaluating St Thomas Aquinas’s account of liberum arbitrium and of the psychological and metaphysical principles that underlie it. The sessions will center on passages from the Summa theologiae, but we will also refer to other works of Aquinas, such as the De Malo and the Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics, and to pertinent texts from other philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, and Anscombe. We will want to address some of the more controversial questions about Thomas’s views, such as the following: Does he differ from Aristotle on the will, and if so, how? Did he change his own mind about the will? To what extent, in Aquinas's account, does the freedom of the will depend upon the distinction between the will and the intellect? Does St Thomas’s apparent intellectualism commit him to some kind of determinism with regard to choice?  Does he offer an adequate account of the choice of evil? In comparison with modern thinkers, does he sufficiently appreciate the value of freedom?

Format: There will be two 2 ½ hour sessions each day. Each session will include an opening lecture and seminar-style discussion of the text and the issues at hand. Students will be expected to prepare the readings carefully and participate in the discussions of the material.

Location:  The seminar will take place at the University of Chicago. Students will be provided with lodging, meals, and a travel stipend of up to $350.

Application Information: 
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students in the humanities and relevant fields (such as philosophy, theology, english, classics, & history).|

 Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).
     

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Seminar Leader:

Stephen L. Brock is is a priest of the Prelature of Opus Dei.  He is Ordinary Professor of Medieval Philosophy at the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross, Rome. He earned a B.A. in Philosophy at the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto.  Brock writes widely on Thomas Aquinas and action theory, ethics, and metaphysics. He is the author of The Philosophy of Saint Thomas Aquinas. A Sketch (Wipf & Stock, 2015) and Action & Conduct: Thomas Aquinas and the Theory of Action (T&T Clark, 1998).  During 2017 he was a visiting scholar in the Philosophy Department at the University of Chicago, collaborating in the Templeton Foundation project “Virtue, Happiness, and Meaning in Life,” directed by Candace Vogler and Jennifer Frey.

Ends on February 15, 2018

“The Thought of John Henry Newman

July 7-14, 2018

Ian Ker

Merton College, University of Oxford

Now in its sixth consecutive year, this intensive seminar will examine the achievements of Blessed John Henry Newman as a theologian, philosopher, educator, preacher, and writer. Remarkably, in each of these areas Newman produced works that have come to be recognized as classics: An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine, The Grammar of Assent, The Idea of a University, The Parochial and Plain Sermons, and the Apologia Pro Vita Sua. This seminar will approach Newman’s thought through a critical engagement with these texts.

Format: There will be two 2-hour sessions each day.  The seminar will include presentations by Prof. Ker and by participants on the readings assigned, followed by seminar style discussion.

Seminar Leader: Ian Ker has taught both English literature and theology at universities in the United States and Britain, where he is currently a member of the Oxford theology faculty. He is the author and editor of more than twenty books on Newman, including the standard biography which Oxford University Press reissued prior to Newman's beatification. He is also the author of The Catholic Revival in English Literature 1845-1961, Mere Catholicism, and most recently, G. K. Chesterton: A Biography.

Location: The seminar will take place at Merton College at the University of Oxford. Students will be provided with lodging and meals while at Oxford, and a travel stipend of up to $700.

Application Information: 
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students in the humanities and relevant fields (such as philosophy, theology, english, classics, & history).

 Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Application materials must be received by 11:59pm on February 15, 2018.

The Lumen Christi Institute exists to promotes the Catholic Intellectual Tradition and is committed to the integration of the intellectual and spiritual life. The Institute welcomes seminar participants of all or no religious affiliation, and wants to assure all applicants that the opportunities to participate in devotional activities are optional.

Any further questions can be directed to seminars@lumenchristi.org.

“Truth and Authority in Augustine's City of God

July 22-29, 2018

Russell Hittinger
Fr. Michael Sherwin, OP

University of California, Berkeley

This seminar is an intensive week-long course in how to read, analyze, and discern the many themes in Augustine’s most ambitious and sprawling work. The City of God tells the history of two societies, and their respective origins, progress, and appointed ends. The story is engaged first from the evidence of profane history (I-XI) and then from the evidence of revelation (XII-XXII). In this seminar, participants will discuss how Augustine reckons with the crisis of the ancient and the human city, and whether it is possible to reconcile truth and authority across the competing domains of polity, religion, and philosophical wisdom. These themes will be approached from an interdisciplinary perspective, addressing questions pertinent to students in political science, philosophy, law, theology, religious studies, and history.

Format: There will be two 2 ½ hour sessions each day. Each session will include an opening lecture and seminar-style discussion of the text and the issues at hand. Students will be expected to prepare the readings carefully and participate in the discussions of the material.

Location:  The seminar will take place at the University of California, Berkeley. Students will be provided with lodging, meals, and a travel stipend of up to $350.

Application Information: 
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students in the humanities and relevant fields (such as philosophy, theology, english, classics, & history).|

 Applicants will be required to submit:

  • A completed online application form.
  • An updated CV.
  • At least one and as many as two letter(s) of recommendation from a member of the program in which the student is currently enrolled.
  • A statement of research interest no longer than 750 words, which includes an explanation of how this seminar might bear on the student’s current or future research plans.
  • One academic writing sample (30 pages maximum).
     

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Seminar Leaders: Russell Hittinger is the William K. Warren Professor of Catholic Studies and Research Professor of Law at the University of Tulsa. He is also a member of the Pontifical Academy of the Social Sciences and the Pontifical Academy of St. Thomas Aquinas. Professor Hittinger is the author of many books, including A Critique of the New Natural Law Theory, The First Grace: Rediscovering Natural Law in a Post-Christian Age, Thomas Aquinas the Rule of Law, and most recently Paper Wars: Catholic Social Doctrine and the Modern State (forthcoming).

Fr. Michael Sherwin, OP is Professor of Fundamental Moral Theology at the University of Fribourg, Switzerland.  He has also taught at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California, where he received his initial formation as a Dominican and was ordained a priest in 1991. Fr. Sherwin is director of the Saint Thomas Aquinas Institute for Theology and Culture and of the Pinckaers Archives.  Author of articles on the psychology of love, virtue ethics and moral development, his monograph, By Knowledge and By Love: Charity and Knowledge in the Moral Theology of St. Thomas Aquinas (CUA Press, 2005) has newly been reissued in paperback.

“Economics and Catholic Social Thought: A Primer

June 10-13, 2018

University of Notre Dame
South Bend, Indiana

Martijn Cremers, University of Notre Dame
Mary Hirschfeld, Villanova University
Joseph P. Kaboski, University of Notre Dame
Fr. Martin Schlag, University of St. Thomas

This seminar is designed as an introduction and immersion into Catholic social thought for graduate students and faculty in economics, finance, or related fields. Participants will cover foundational principles in Catholic social thought starting with the human person, dignity, freedom, subsidiarity, solidarity, and the common good, and moving toward applications of these principles to conceptual understandings and ethical considerations involving economic topics such as utility theory, firm and business ethics, wages, markets, globalization, poverty, and development. Participants will delve into social encyclicals, secondary sources, and relevant economics texts.

This seminar is cosponsored by the Catholic Research Economists Discussion Organization.

Format: There will be two sessions each day, featuring a different instructor. Each instructor will open with a lecture, and then we will turn to a seminar style discussion of the texts and issues at hand. In the final sessions, we will discuss how the material can be applied to each student’s particular area of interest.

Location: The seminar will take place at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, will be provided with accommodations and meals, and a limited number of travel stipends are available on a need basis.

Application Information:
This seminar will be open to Ph.D. students and faculty in Economics, Finance and related fields.

Applicants will be required to submit a completed online application form, including:

  • An updated CV.
  • A brief statement of research interest no longer than 750 words.
  • One academic writing sample.

All application materials can be submitted via the online application. Incomplete applications will not be considered. 15 students will be admitted to this seminar.

Application materials must be received by 11:59pm on FEBRUARY 15, 2018.

Please direct any further questions to contact@credo-economists.org.